Certified Refurbished Kindle Paperwhite E-reader - Black, 6" High-Resolution Display (300 ppi) with Built-in Light, Wi-Fi - Includes Special Offers

Certified Refurbished Kindle Paperwhite E-reader - Black, 6" High-Resolution Display (300 ppi) with Built-in Light, Wi-Fi - Includes Special Offers
From Amazon

List Price: $109.00
Price: $84.99 Details

Availability: Usually ships in 24 hours
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com

Average customer review:
(4.5 stars, based on 40325 reviews)

Product Details

  • Sales Rank: #67 in Amazon Ereaders
  • Size: 4 GB
  • Color: Black
  • Brand: Amazon
  • Model: DP75SDI
  • Released on: 2015-06-30
  • Dimensions: .36" h x 4.61" w x 6.65" l, .45 pounds
  • Battery type: Lithium
  • Display size: 6

Features

  • A Certified Refurbished Paperwhite E-reader is refurbished, tested, and certified to look and work like new
  • New, higher resolution display (300 ppi)--now with twice as many pixels
  • Now with Bookerly, our exclusive font, hand-crafted from the ground up for faster reading with less eyestrain
  • Built-in adjustable light--read day and night
  • Unlike tablets, no screen glare, even in bright sunlight
  • A single battery charge lasts weeks, not hours
  • Massive selection, lowest prices--over a million titles at $2.99 or less
  • Prime members read free with unlimited access to over a thousand titles

Introducing the all-new Kindle Paperwhite—Featuring our highest resolution display, hand-crafted font Bookerly, and a new typesetting engine for even more beautiful rendering of pages. Our best-selling Kindle is now even better.

Kindle Paperwhite

Highest resolution e-reader display

New—With twice as many pixels as the previous generation, the all-new Kindle Paperwhite has an improved high-resolution 300 ppi display for crisp, laser quality text. No other e-reader offers a higher resolution display.

Next-generation reading experience

New—The all-new Kindle Paperwhite now offers Bookerly, an exclusive font crafted from the ground up for reading on digital screens. Warm and contemporary, Bookerly is inspired by the artistry of the best fonts in modern print books, but is hand-crafted for great readability at any font size.

Coming soon—All-new typesetting engine lays out words just as the author intended for beautiful rendering of pages. With improved character spacing and the addition of hyphenation, justification, kerning, ligatures, and drop cap support, our best-in-class typography helps you read faster with less eyestrain.

Enjoy reading with larger font sizes without compromising your reading experience. Page layout and margins automatically adapt to work well at even the largest font sizes. The new typography and layout improvements are available on over half a million books, including many best sellers, with thousands more being added every week.

No glare in bright sunlight

Unlike reflective tablet and smartphone screens, the latest Kindle Paperwhite reads like paper.

Won't tire your eyes in the dark

Kindle Paperwhite guides light toward the surface of the display with its built-in front light—so you can read comfortably without eyestrain. Adjust your screen's brightness for great reading in any light.

Charge monthly, not daily

Kindle Paperwhite won't leave you tethered to an outlet. A single charge can last up to six weeks (based on a half hour of reading per day with wireless turned off and the light setting at ten).

Kindle Paperwhite

Read comfortably with one hand

Lighter than a paperback, comfortably hold Kindle Paperwhite in one hand for those times when you can't put the book down.

Lose yourself in a book

By design, Kindle Paperwhite is purpose-built for reading and creates a sanctuary so you can lose yourself in a book. Unlike tablets and phones, Kindle doesn't distract you with social media, emails, and text messages.

Take and share notes

Add margin notes that you can edit, delete, or even export from your device to your computer. Share highlighted sections and meaningful quotes on Facebook, Twitter, and Goodreads, and see passages frequently highlighted by other Kindle readers.

Kindle Paperwhite

Look it up instantly without leaving your page

Smart Lookup integrates entries from The New Oxford American Dictionary with information from X-Ray and Wikipedia, so you can access definitions, characters, settings, and more without losing your place.

Read more challenging books

Word Wise makes it easier to enjoy and quickly understand more challenging books. Short and simple definitions automatically appear above difficult words, so you can keep reading with fewer interruptions. Tap on a word to bring up a simple card with definitions, synonyms, and more. Available on many popular English language titles.

Build your vocabulary

Words looked up in the dictionary are automatically added to Vocabulary Builder to expand your knowledge and reinforce retention. Swipe through your vocabulary words, quiz yourself with flashcards, and instantly see those words in context.

Share your library

With Family Library, you and your family can access and easily share not only your own Kindle books, but also books from the linked Amazon account of a spouse or partner.

Lowest book prices, massive selection

Over a million titles are priced at $2.99 or less. Over 2 million titles are $9.99 or less.

Kindle Paperwhite

Set goals and celebrate with achievement badges

Kids can read books in a simple, fun, and safe environment designed specifically for them with Kindle FreeTime. Kids are rewarded with achievement badges when they reach their reading milestones. A progress report keeps parents updated on total time spent reading, number of words looked up, badges earned, and books read.

Compare Kindle E-readers

  Kindle Kindle Paperwhite Kindle Voyage
Price From $79 From $119 From $199
Resolution 167 ppi 300 ppi 300 ppi
Built-In Light No Yes Yes + Adaptive light sensor
Page Turns Touchscreen Touchscreen Touchscreen + PagePress
Connectivity Wi-Fi Wi-Fi or Wi-Fi + free 3G Wi-Fi or Wi-Fi + free 3G
Screen Size 6"
Glare-Free Screen Yes
Battery Life Weeks on a single charge
Storage Holds thousands of books
Weight 6.7 oz Wi-Fi: 7.2 oz
Wi-Fi + 3G: 7.6 oz
Wi-Fi: 6.3 oz
Wi-Fi + 3G: 6.6 oz
Dimensions 6.7" x 4.7" x 0.40" 6.7" x 4.6" x 0.36" 6.4" x 4.5" x 0.30"


Customer Reviews

Most helpful customer reviews

9075 of 9345 people found the following review helpful.
5No big improvement in the 2015 model
By Desert Rat
Review updated September 17, 2015

As a background, I am a retired Information Systems professional and I am writing this review from the perspective of being a long-time Kindle user. I have all the current e-readers and Fire devices from Amazon including the basic Kindle, the 2013, 2014 and new 2015 Paperwhite, the Fire HD6, Fire HD7, Fire HDX7 and Fire HDX8.9. This review is for the 2015 “All-New Kindle Paperwhite.” The attached picture shows the 2014 Kindle on the left and the new 2015 Kindle on the right. Here is the summary of my initial impressions of the 2015 model versus the 2014 model.

I am somewhat disappointed in the 2015 version as there is not a huge improvement over last year’s model. The Paperwhite made many improvements from its original first generation 2012 model to its second generation 2013 model, especially in the display and processor area. The 2013 model came with 2 GB storage, a wonderful display, a great battery and was the e-book “workhorse.” The second generation 2014 model changed by only increasing storage to 4 GB. The third generation 2015 model increased the display resolution but reduced the battery life slightly.

WHAT COMES IN THE BOX: A Paperwhite device, a quick-start guide and a short USB cord. Amazon still does not supply a power adapter.

SIZE: It’s the same identical size as the older Paperwhites. The weight has been reduced slightly from 7.3 to 7.2 ounces, a fraction of an ounce, most likely because of a smaller battery.
The good news is that all cases that fit the other Paperwhites will fit the 2015 version!!

DISPLAY: The resolution has been bumped up to 300 ppi, equivalent to the Voyage. However, in practical use, I can’t tell the difference unless I put an earlier version next to the new version for comparison. Unfortunately, when I place them side-by-side, I noticed that the new Paperwhite is not quite as bright as the older models when set at the same brightness level. This is more noticeable at lower settings. Also, my Kindle has a slight shadow area along the bottom that appears as a small gray smudge and isn’t quite as evenly lit as the rest of the display. It is very small but noticeable. The logo on the bottom of the screen is now shiny black against matte black on the plastic case instead of being displayed in silver lettering. It's difficult to see except when viewing the shiny "Kindle" reflection at an angle to light.
(September 2015 update: The Kindle logo is how I tell my new 2015 Paperwhite and older Paperwhites apart. They are that similar!)

BATTERY: The battery of the 2013 and 2014 Paperwhites are rated a third larger than the new model. And it is noticeable! When operating simultaneously, the new PW battery drains much faster. It is currently rated at 6 weeks of ½ hour average daily usage versus 8 weeks for the older models. That specification translates to 21 hours of use versus 28 hours of use for the older models.

(September 2015 update: I was on a week-long vacation trip but forgot my chargers. I had the 2014 Kindle with me, and as I was on vacation, I read a lot. The battery lasted--barely--the entire vacation. Given the shorter battery life, the 2015 model would have lost power before I came home. Normally, this shouldn't be an issue for most people as the 2015 battery does last a long time. But.... I am so spoilt by not having to carry a charger on trips, even long trips.)

STORAGE: Nothing has changed. It comes with the same 4 GB of storage. Mine netted 2990 MB free space from the factory. This number will vary slightly from device to device depending on the actual hard drive.

HARDWARE: Alas, there is still no audio with the Paperwhite. So you still can’t play songs in the background or listen to Audible books. If you need audio features, you may want to look at the Kindle Fire lineup as audio capabilities are not available on the PaperWhite, standard Kindle, or the Kindle Voyage. (September 2015 update: I still wish I could listen to Audible books like you could on the Kindle Keyboard.)

Wifi: Nothing has changed. I had hoped for an upgrade to 802.11ac or at least add the less crowded 5-Ghz range of wifi. If you are in a wifi crowded area, you will need to be closer to your router to download books. While the Paperwhite does not use a lot of bandwidth, it does need to be able to communicate with a router for WhisperSync to work and to download books.

It is possible that the new Kindle Paperwhite either has a slightly faster processor, or more likely, the memory has been upgraded from 512MB to 1024MB to match the Voyage. I have over a thousand books installed. To keep track of what I have, all books are added to collections, such as “Reading Queue” for those I have not read but want to read, and “Already Read” for those books I have already read. In addition, my books are also categorized by genre collections such as “Crime/Mystery/Thriller,” “SciFi/Fantasy,” "Historical Fiction," "Romance," etc. Categorizing my books helps me considerably when I wish to find a new book to read in my library which I have not read and what I want is a Mystery novel, but not a SciFi. When I download a new book and try to add it to the appropriate collections for later enjoyment, the process can be extremely slow, so slow that sometimes, I am not sure that I have even touched the check box in the add-to-collection screen because it takes forever to respond. The 2015 Kindle seems to be faster in that area.

(September 2015 update: I've noticed that the speed is directly related to the strength and quality of the WiFi signal. I am in a crowded WiFi area and although I can get a fairly good signal, the speed definitely degrades when I am not in the same room as the router. I still wish it had a 5Ghz antennae as that bandwidth is less crowded and faster.)

SOFTWARE: The user interface on the new Paperwhite is identical to the old Paperwhite except that the new Paperwhite comes with the Bookerly font installed. Those who own one of the new Fire tablets already have the Bookerly font for comparison. Personally, on the Paperwhite, I like the Caecilian and Palatino fonts as much as I do the Bookerly. It seems that the best font for reading changes depending on the book and the magnification of the font. (There are still eight size magnifications.) However, the firmware version installed with my 2015 Paperwhite was a version behind. The Firmware Version installed on the 2015 model is Kindle 5.6.1.1 (2634130033) versus Kindle 5.6.2.1 (263439002) installed on my 2014 model.

(September 2015 update: Amazon has updated the software on all their Kindles so the Bookerly font is available on all the devices.)

WITH SPECIAL OFFERS OR WITHOUT?? If you buy a case that automatically shuts the device off when closed and turns on when opened, I strongly recommend paying the extra $20 for removing the ads. If you have special offers, the Kindle still needs to be swiped from the lock screen to get to the page of the book where you left off. If you do NOT have special offers, when you open your case, you are immediately brought to the book and page where you stopped reading. No lock screen! Having a Kindle Paperwhite without special offers is wonderful. Open up the case, Kindle turns on and you pick up right where you left off. Close the case and it turns off. No extra finger swipes! This is true only for the Kindle e-readers. The Fire tablets continue to open up to the lock screen which must be swiped irrelevant of whether you have special offers or not.
NOTE: I received the advanced order of the 2015 Paperwhite on June 30. I was not able to order the device without special offers. Normally, you should be able to pay the upgrade difference online to remove special offers. Unfortunately, the device that I have received does not have an option to remove special offers for this device only! I do not know if this option will be available for all new orders or if they will correct the oversight in the future. So, order the device without special offers if you think you will ultimately want that because it is possible that you will not be able to remove them in the future.

(September 2015 update: Amazon fixed the option to remove special offers. And I still recommend that you buy it without special offers if you use a case that automatically turns it on and off.)

SUMMARY FOR THOSE LOOKING TO UPGRADE:
This is what has changed from the 2014 model.
PLUS: Higher resolution screen with Bookerly font. Possibly quicker when managing large numbers of books. (September 2015 update: Bookerly font is now available on all Kindle devices including older Paperwhites)
MINUS: A smaller battery and shorter time life between charges. No power adapter.
NEUTRAL: The "kindle" logo at the bottom of the 2015 model is now black on black instead of the silver color at the bottom front of the 2014 model.
(September 2015 update: The Kindle logo is how I tell my newer and older Paperwhites apart.)

THE VERDICT: The new Paperwhite is still the state-of-the-art e-ink e-book reader. The only things I can think of to improve the Paperwhite is to add a power adapter, a longer USB cord, bring back the longer battery life of the earlier model and perhaps make it waterproof.

(September 2015 update: the Paperwhite is still my favorite reader. I also like the Voyage but not enough to justify the huge price difference.)

Although the Paperwhite is only an e-reader and not a tablet, there are other considerations:
* No distraction from email
* No distractions from text messages
* No distractions from phone calls.

SHOULD YOU BUY? If you own last year's Paperwhite - I don't think it is worth the upgrade. If you do not own an e-reader or have a 2012 or earlier Kindle version, definitely get the Paperwhite. It has the best mix of features for the price compared to the other Kindle e-reader models. If you are considering upgrading from the current basic $79 Kindle, definitely get the Paperwhite. If you are considering whether to get the Voyage or the Paperwhite, ask yourself, "Is getting the Page Press area at the edge of the screen worth an additional $80?" If not, get the Paperwhite.

(September 2015 update: I really like both the Paperwhite and the Voyage. But I can't tell you which one to buy. If you are the type that will buy a Cadillac instead of a Chevy, buy the Voyage. It is definitely a very nice reader. Personally, I like the Paperwhite. Even though the Voyage is slightly smaller and lighter in the hand, there is something about the Paperwhite that makes me grab it instead.)

For reading, I prefer the Paperwhite over all the readers including the Fire tablets, the basic Kindle and even the Voyage. It’s optimized for readers and reasonably priced. You can throw it in your purse or pocket for traveling, even for reading in the doctor’s office waiting room. If you forget to charge it overnight, it will still have enough juice to get you through the next day or two. You can read it on the beach in BRIGHT, BRIGHT sunlight or at night under DARK, DARK moonlight. Whether you sit on the front porch or hide under the bed covers, you can enjoy reading books with the Paperwhite. In addition, there is a huge selection of case styles and colors to trick out your Kindle to match your personality and reading style.

If you want to save a little money, Amazon is currently selling the 2014 model for $109. Although it doesn’t have the Bookerly font, it does have a better battery. You can’t go wrong with the 2014 model either, especially when it is slightly cheaper.

(September 2015 update: My older Paperwhites have been updated with new software and now all have the Bookerly font. Unfortunately, the 2014 model is no longer available for sale through Amazon.)

FOR NEWBIES: You might want to explore the following features.

VOCABULARY BUILDER: The Amazon Kindles have a tool called Vocabulary Builder which is not available in the Fire tablets. Vocabulary Builder is supposed to help you learn new words while you read: words you look up in the Kindle's dictionary are stored in Vocabulary Builder. You can review those words, test yourself with flash cards, even see where in a book you highlighted the word and remove the word from your list when you’ve mastered it.

PAGE FLIP: When you're on a page, swipe up from the bottom, and a slightly smaller pop-up of the page appears. The pop-up has page turn arrows to go back or go forward in the book (you can also just swipe the pop-up page). When you're ready to return to your original page, press the "X" in the upper right corner of the pop-up, and the pop-up page goes away.

HIGHLIGHT: The highlight feature allows you to highlight (in black-and-white of course) a particular passage in a book and save it so you can go back to it at a later time. You also have the option of turning on an option that shows you other popular highlights from other readers of the book. This is a VERY useful feature, especially for non-fiction books as 99% of the time, the highlights other users have made point out very important sentences and paragraphs in the book. Note that this feature does not show EVERY reader's highlights, it only shows the most popular ones and even tells you how many readers have highlighted a particular section. This can be turned on or off if you find it distracting.

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7278 of 7521 people found the following review helpful.
5A great product that's now even better
By J. Chambers
[[VIDEOID:755c0182976ece27e407ad23676f3ae8]]If you're reading reviews of the new 3rd generation Paperwhite, you're likely considering buying one. If so, you're probably in one of these categories:
* Never owned a Kindle e-ink reader
* Own an older Kindle e-ink reader, but not a Paperwhite
* Own a first or second generation Paperwhite

I'll save my opinion on whether the new Paperwhite 3 is worth buying until the end of my review. (But I will say this: They've taken a great product and made it even better.) First, here's a comparison of the new Paperwhite with the second generation Paperwhite (comparisons are for the wi-fi models):

Second Generation Paperwhite (2013)
-------------------------------------------
Size: 6.7"x4.6"x0.36"
Weight (wi-fi version): 7.3 ounces
Display: 6" diagonal, 212 pixels per inch, 16-level grayscale, LED frontlit
Storage memory: 4GB
Page turns: Touchscreen
Number of fonts: 6
Display lighting: Manually adjustable front-lighting

All-New Paperwhite (2015)
------------------------------
Size: 6.7"x4.6"x0.36"
Weight (wi-fi version): 7.2 ounces
Display: 6" diagonal, 300 pixels per inch, 16-level grayscale, LED frontlit
Storage memory: 4GB
Page turns: Touchscreen
Number of fonts: 7
Display lighting: Manually adjustable front-lighting

Note that the physical size is identical to the older Paperwhite, so covers and sleeves that worked with the older Paperwhites are still usable (thank you, Amazon). The most obvious difference is the screen resolution: 300 pixels per inch is a major jump from the 212 pixels per inch in the older Paperwhites. With text, you may or may not notice the characters are slightly crisper, but the higher resolution is a most welcomed improvement for books that have illustrations, maps, or photographs - they'll be noticeably most detailed.

Another addition is the newly designed Bookerly font. It appears to me to be a slightly softer, more rounded font. I like it, but I'll have to use it for a while to see if I prefer it over the Caecilia font that I usually use.

Unlike backlit tablets and phones, which wash out badly in sunlight, the Paperwhite is very readable in any lighting condition from total darkness to bright sunshine, simply by adjusting the built-in lighting level. The touch screen's responsiveness has been noticeably improved over the original Paperwhite, but I couldn't tell any obvious difference compared to the second generation Paperwhite.

About the battery life: Amazon says "A single charge lasts up to six weeks, based on a half hour of reading per day with wireless off and the light setting at 10." People's reading habits vary too much to generalize about battery life. Also, the lighting level will vary - for example, my preferred lighting level for the conditions where I read most of the time is 15. Unlike the Kindle Fires that show the percentage of remaining battery charge, the Paperwhites only have a crude graphic indicator. I've gotten into the habit of charging my Kindle about once a week, so I don't worry about it. I also leave the wi-fi connection turned on so that the Kindle can receive any software updates when they come in.

My thoughts about the "Special Offers": To me, it's not worth the $20 to opt out of the special offers. They're not really intrusive, and they don't pop up while you're reading, and sometimes you'll even see an offer that you like. After a while, you hardly notice the ads. My advice is to take the special offers and save $20. Later, if you find you don't like seeing them, you can ante up the $20 and opt out.

My thoughts about wi-fi only versus wi-fi + 3G: The wi-fi + 3G model is $70 more than the wi-fi only model. Nowadays with wi-fi being so available just about everywhere you go, most people won't need 3G. However, if you do decide to get the wi-fi + 3G Paperwhite, note that that there's no additional cost to download books over 3G (the book publishers pay that cost).

One more comment: None of the Paperwhites have audio features, including text-to-speech, speaker, or headphone jack. Audio has not been included in any of the e-ink Kindles for several years, and I doubt if it will ever return. If you want to play audio books or music, Amazon wants you to buy a Kindle Fire.

Note: The Paperwhite 3 comes with a USB charging cable but no charger. Any AC charger or vehicle charger that outputs 5 volts at about 1 amp should work just fine. This includes any Kindle chargers you already have, as well as most cellphone chargers.

-----------------------------------------

Okay, what's the bottom line? The new Paperwhite is a superb ebook reader, a continuing evolution of the super-popular Paperwhite series. I have the impression that Amazon has taken the Paperwhite 2 and tweaked it from top to bottom to make the new Paperwhite 3 as good as it can be. But is it worth the money to upgrade? Here's my opinion:

* If you've never owned an e-ink reader but are considering buying one, the Paperwhite 3 is a marvelous ebook reader that makes the original Kindle (released in 2007) look like an antique by comparison (and that Kindle cost $399). It's time to go digital, and at the current selling price, the new Paperwhite can't be beat.
* If you own an older Kindle e-ink reader, but not a Paperwhite, by all means upgrade. It's not that expensive, and it provides a hugely improved reading experience compared to earlier Kindles.
* If you own a first or second generation Paperwhite, in most ways, the new Paperwhite is not a huge step up, and you're fine with your current Paperwhite. However, if you read a lot of books with illustrations, maps, or photographs, the higher screen resolution will make those images more viewable, and that could make the cost of the upgrade worth it. And if you're like my wife and me, whenever we upgraded, there were always family members or friends who were happy to take the old Kindles off our hands.
* There is one more possibility - the Paperwhite is a touchscreen device, using touches and swipes to operate, including a pop-up onscreen keypad for typing. If you're one of those folks who really misses the raised buttons that the earlier Kindles had, you're pretty much out of luck unless you want to buy a Kindle Voyage, which has embedded sensors that work kind of like buttons, but it's considerably more expensive than the Paperwhite.

If you have any questions, please feel free to ask in the comments or by email.

4452 of 4611 people found the following review helpful.
5Small changes in specifications that mean a lot to me for my reading comfort!
By JJCEO
[[VIDEOID:547c58e6ce0688159b673141e68403c]]Getting a Kindle to read with changed my life. For 50 + years I read a book every 2 days or less. As my eyes got worse, for many reasons, I just had to quit. Reading a paperback was hard and after 10 minutes of reading I simply gave up. With a Kindle I can adjust the font style and size and read for hours a day. The best straight forward reading tablet I previously owned is the Kindle Paperwhite 2013 version. This new release improves in an area that I want and one that I paid to upgrade my tablet for. The new 2015 screen has 300 PPI versus 212 PPI for the 2013 version and the screen resolution is almost twice as good as the older Kindle. The change is from 768x1024 to 1072x1448 pixels and that is a tremendous improvement and luxury for those with older eyes.

One downside is that the new Kindle Paperwhite does have a lower battery life when compared to the previous generation. The battery life has dropped from 8 weeks at ½ hour of reading per day to 6 weeks at ½ hour of reading per day. That is due to the additional energy required for the higher resolution screen and the power to render the higher resolution of text. I don't like the reduced reading time but for me this was not a big deal as it is still 21 hours of reading time (It was 28 hours on the 2013 version) and it charges quickly in 4 hours. Heck, my expensive iPad battery only lasts about 8 hours and the eyestrain is pretty tough to handle using the iPad for more than 30 minutes to read. Some people may not like this but I just recharge my Kindles every three or four days. Since the unit has a lower battery life I do believe that Amazon should have included a USB charger as someone that travels may not be carrying a laptop computer with them to charge the Kindle Paperwhite. This omission of a USB charger is still a sore point with many people. I wish Amazon would just raise the price $10 and include the charger as a standard feature!

I have added a video of the Kindle Paperwhite 2013 compared to a Kindle Paperwhite 2015 and a Kindle Keyboard. If you have any questions please feel free to contact me and I will try to answer them.

Things to do with your new Kindle Paperwhite:

* Get a simple light weight case that will turn off the screen when you close the cover. It will help save on your battery life and protect your tablet.
* Enter in a device pass code to protect your tablet in case you lose your tablet. This prevents someone from using your tablet and even from buying books using your account.
* Yes you can use just about any USB charger for this Kindle Paperwhite. I use the one that came with my Kindle Keyboard unit and it works fine.

I own multiple Kindle Fires, HP tablets and Apple iPads and Android tablets but the best reading device is a Kindle Paperwhite. Why? It is simply because I can read it outside in the sunlight, inside and at night with reduced eyestrain when compared to any other tablet I own. It is the read anyplace best tablet for reading hands down champion!

I just love this new tablet. It offers the perfect balance of a lit screen with reduced eyestrain and high clarity and contrast of the text and a good price. It is truly a step up to a better reading device. The new reading font called Bookerly is very good for my eyes. It is crisper and bolder on the screen and I can read for longer times than before. Toss in the higher screen resolution and you have a new reading experience.

I am always looking for improvements in the text and screen quality as for me that is a major issue. The print on the screen is blacker and crisper and it is easier on my eyes. Side by side with my Kindle Paperwhite 2013 the older Paperwhite text looks grey and the screen slightly yellow in comparison to this newer version. There definitely is a good improvement and that relates to more reading comfort for my eyes!

This newer 2015 Paperwhite has a few new features that I like:

* 300 PPI versus older 2013 Paperwhite at 212 PPI
* New reading font Bookerly that is bolder and designed for use on a digital screen
* 4 GB of memory versus my 2013 version that was launched with 2 GIG (Not enough for me)

Reading was my number one hobby my entire life and I just loved it. The Kindle has brought back that reading experience and now with the crisper text, better font and no glare lit screen I can enjoy my reading in every type of environment. In my video I compare the Kindle Keyboard, Kindle Paperwhite 2013 and the Kindle Paperwhite 2015 side by side. The improvements are amazing.

The new screen clarity is where this Paperwhite design really is outstanding. With better contrast, lighting and custom designed fonts, the text just pops out of the screen like you have not seen in an e-Reader before. With 300 PPI (Pixels Per Inch) this screen provides a 1072 by 1448 pixel screen that just makes the old Kindle screens look old fashioned.

My favorite time to read is the last two hours of the evening before bedtime. I also read during the day during breaks and even at my grandson's outdoor swim meets. It is impossible to read in the sunlight with a Kindle Fire or an iPad. There is simply too much glare. At night time the Kindle Paperwhite soft lit screen is unobtrusive and for me my eyes do not get tired of reading like they do on the Kindle Fire and on the iPad. I can actually read for hours without the same eyestrain I get with other tablets. You also have adjustable brightness to suit your own comfort levels and ambient conditions.

There are multiple font sizes and you can pinch and zoom on the Kindle Paperwhite screen to expand the font size or decrease it like you do on a powerful tablet, this is a great feature. There are 7 different font styles and they are Baskerville, Bookerly, Futura, Caecilia, Helvetica, Caecilia Condensed and Palatino. I think my favorite is Bookerly. I love the new dictionary feature that creates a Vocabulary Builder which is a list of the words that you looked up and you can review the list and use flashcards to enhance your vocabulary and reading skills.

There is a minor learning curve of learning where to touch the screen if you are transitioning from a much older Kindle tablet but the changeover was fast and easy. The capacitive touch response of the screen is very nice. It makes the New Paperwhite respond quickly to finger touches, menu changes and page turns. What I like about the Kindle Paperwhite is that it is a dedicated e-Reader and it combines the best features of the Kindle e-ink and the iPad/Kindle Fire.

* Ultra lightweight at 7.2 ounces and easily held for hours with one hand. I love the size and weight as it is comfortable to hold for long periods of time and you don't find yourself laying down the Paperwhite like I would be doing with my iPads. What I love is that it still weighs 7.2 ounces with 1000 books loaded into it!
* Lit screen for reading in poorly lighted areas like the iPad and Kindle Fire but without the eyestrain. The lighting level is adjustable.
* High clarity of the text and contrast for easy reading. The screen has 16 levels of gray scale available.
* Fast charging time in 4 hours
* Ability to be easily read in the sunlight with no screen glare.
* WIFI connectability
* Battery life of 21 hours (of reading time) depending on the WIFI usage and screen brightness used. You can turn off your WIFI to prolong the battery life. This specification dropped from 28 hours on the Kindle Paperwhite 2013 version.
* Touch screen control
* Easy page turning and access to the onboard dictionary, access to Wikipedia and X-Ray.
* Easy to access menu and setup was a breeze
* Fast response for loading books and page turning thanks to a faster microprocessor.
* Small, thin and highly portable
* Able to carry 3,400 books
* My favorite feature is the adjustable text size and font style!
* Custom tuned fonts add clarity and crispness to the quality of the displayed text
* Since I review a lot of books I love to highlight sections and text as well as take notes on the screen.
* Translation of foreign language that is used in the book
* Web surfing is possible but still slower than a good tablet. Who cares, this is my portable eBook reader with 3,400 books in it (depending on the book file size). I have other devices to browse the web and read my email.
* I like the rubberized feel of the back and it is similar to my Kindle Fire. It makes the Kindle Paperwhite easy to grip and hold with one hand and just have it lay in the palm of my hand without a case.

This tablet gives me the best reading conditions in the daytime and also in the night. It has a lot of great features but I wanted to post a review that provides a strong comparison between the new Kindle Paperwhite and the last Kindle Paperwhite 2013 version.

--------------------------Kindle Paperwhite 2013---------Kindle Paperwhite 2015
Screen size: -------------------- 6 inch------------------------6 inch
Screen PPI----------------------212--------------------------300
Resolution: ---------------------768x1024-------------------1072x1448
Weight: --------------------------7.3 ounces------------------7.2 ounces per the manual
Overall Size: --------------------6.7"x4.6"x0.36"-----------6.7"x4.6"x0.36
Battery life in hours of reading: 28 hours----------------21 hours
Charging Time: -----------------4 hours----------------------4 hours
Eyestrain: ------none under all reading conditions----------none
Memory: -------------------------2 GIG --------------------4 GIG with 3 GIG available for the user
Number of books: -------------1,100--------------------------3,400 approximately
Included charger: --------------No---------------------------No
WIFI Connectability: ----------Fast and easy--------------Fast and easy
Speakers: ------------------------No----------------------------No

Other considerations:
* No distraction from email
* No distractions from text messages
* No distractions from phone calls.

Pros:
* You can use a capacitive stylus on the screen to help keep the screen clean.
* Great battery life and fast charging.
* Perfect form factor for size and weight for a hand held portable e-reader.
* I don't need to use the stupid book light that never worked well anyway!
* Faster page tuning which for me really makes a difference.
* Connection to the WIFI was fast and easy.
* Downloading my book library was fast and easy.
* Even though the screen has slight texture to it is does not show fingerprints as bad as a glossy screen like a Kindle Fire or an iPad
* Increase of the standard memory size to 4 GIG from the older versions 2 GIG

Cons:

* The battery life has dropped from 8 weeks at ½ hour of reading per day to 6 weeks at ½ hour of reading per day (Roughly 28 hours to 21 hours). That is due to the additional energy required for the higher resolution screen and the power to render the higher resolution of text. For me this was not a big deal as it is still 21 hours of reading time and it charges quickly in 4 hours.
* It still costs extra money for an AC wall adapter. It comes with a USB to Micro USB cable that you can use for charging and connecting to any AC USB wall adapter or computer USB port. I don't need another USB power adapter but not getting one just makes Amazon look cheap in not supplying one with the product.
* They charge extra money to remove push ads to your Kindle Paperwhite
* No speakers and no ability to have the book read aloud to you using text to speech.

Summary:
Overall considering all the issues this is a great e-Reader. It is the best available at this time when you consider the price and the features. So far I have not been able to justify the price jump to $199 for the Kindle Voyage for the small differences with the new Kindle Paperwhite. I do feel that Amazon always gives some things and takes away others. Things like text to speech, speakers and AC wall chargers disappear from new products and sometimes return in others. I also don't care for the ads still being pushed in our faces. This is still a solid 5 star product and you can't go wrong with buying one. It is just that sometimes the things you lose seem to mean more to users than to Amazon. I don't mind them saving some money but raise the price $10 and put in all the features that users will need like a charger.

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