Nikon AF-S DX NIKKOR 35mm f/1.8G Lens with Auto Focus for Nikon DSLR Cameras

Nikon AF-S DX NIKKOR 35mm f/1.8G Lens with Auto Focus for Nikon DSLR Cameras
From Nikon

List Price: $199.95
Price: $196.95 Details

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Average customer review:
(5.0 stars, based on 2690 reviews)

Product Details

  • Color: Black
  • Brand: Nikon
  • Model: 2183
  • Dimensions: 2.76" h x 2.76" w x 2.09" l, .44 pounds

Features

  • 35mm focal length, Minimum focus distance : 0.30m/11.81inch
  • 52.5mm equivalent focal length on DX cameras, 52mm filters
  • F1.8 maximum aperture; F22 minimum
  • Ultrasonic-type AF motor with full-time manual focusing
  • Nikon F mount for for DX DSLRs
  • Lens not zoomable

The AF-S DX Nikkor 35mm f/1.8G optical design allows a different look and feel to images taken with zoom lenses, and its dimensions are ideal for discrete snapshots and landscape shooting with a picture angle that approximates that of the human eye. With its rounded seven-blade diaphragm opening, out-of-focus elements appear more natural. When mounted on a DX-format SLR, the picture angle is the 35mm equivalent focal length of 50mm.what's in the box: Nikon AF-S Nikkor 35mm f/1.8G DX Lens, HB-46 Bayonet Lens Hood for AF-S DX NIKKOR 35mm f/1.8G, 52mm Snap-On Lens Cap, LF-1 Rear Lens Cap for F Mount Lenses, CL-0913 Soft Lens Case and 5-Year Warranty (1-Year International + 4-Year USA Extension).

From the Manufacturer

With a compact, lightweight design, the AF-S DX NIKKOR 35mm f/1.8G provides the high reproduction capability and picture quality for which Nikkor lenses are renowned at an affordable price. The ring type SWM offers quiet AF operation. Although all lens groups shift during focusing, the front element and filter mount do not rotate and the barrel length does not change, which is useful when using filter mounted SB-R200 Wireless Remote Speedlight units.

The AF-S DX Nikkor 35mm f/1.8G optical design allows a different look and feel to images taken with zoom lenses, and its dimensions are ideal for discrete snapshots and landscape shooting with a picture angle that approximates that of the human eye. With its rounded seven-blade diaphragm opening, out-of-focus elements appear more natural. When mounted on a DX-format SLR, the picture angle is the 35mm equivalent focal length of 50mm.

The AF-S Nikkor 35mm f/1.8G has two focus modes, M/A (manual override autofocus) and M (manual focus). The M/A mode enables instant manual switching during AF operation. The lens also features a rubber seal to minimize moisture ingression around the mount and can focus down to 0.3 meters (0.98 ft).

AF-S DX Nikkor 35mm f/1.8G Lens Highlights

  • Fast, f/1.8 prime lens is perfect for low-light conditions, travel, environmental portrait and general photography
  • Engineered for Nikon DX-format D-SLRS, the AF-S DX Nikkor 35mm f/1.8G lens renders a picture angle approximating the classic normal angle of view of a 50mm lens on a Nikon FXformat digital SLR or 35mm film camera
  • Aspherical lens element minimizes coma and other types of lens aberrations, further improving image integrity
  • Nikon Super Integrated Coating (SIC) enhances light transmission efficiency and offers color consistency and reduced flare
  • Exclusive Nikon Silent Wave Motor (SWM) enables fast, accurate and quiet autofocus
  • Close focusing to 1 foot for creative perspectives and versatility
  • Rounded 7-blade diaphragm opening makes out-of-focus elements appear more natural
  • Accepts 52mm filter attachments
35mm Lens Construction35mm MTF Chart

Review from dpreview.com

An in-depth review from the DPReview.com staff Learn more about this camera
at DPReview.com  This link will open in a new browser window or tab.
Nikon 35mm f/1.8G AF-S DX Lens: Highly Recommended by dpreview.com

The AF-S Nikkor 35mm F1.8G DX is a lens which certainly caused a degree of dismay on its release, with many Nikon fans disappointed by the decision to make it compatible with the DX format only. However the main benefit of that decision is plain for all to see - even at its introductory price the lens costs rather less than the venerable AF-Nikkor 35mm F2.0D, despite the addition of an AF-S motor to allow autofocusing on Nikon's entry-level D40 / D40X / D60 bodies. It's also less than half the price of the few other DX format standard primes currently on the market (such as the Pentax 35mm F2.8 Macro, Tokina 35mm F2.8 Macro and Sigma 30mm F1.4 EX DC HSM), so Nikon has managed with this lens to produce the first genuinely inexpensive (sub-$200) fast standard prime designed specifically for digital SLRs.

Within this context, the lens's performance is very impressive. It produces finely detailed images at all apertures (although with somewhat low contrast wide open), focuses quickly and accurately, and handles well in a small, light package. In particular, it's much sharper than typical DX standard zooms such as the Nikon AF-S 18-55mm F3.5-5.6 DX VR or Nikon AF-S 18-200mm F3.5-5.6 DX VR. The fast maximum aperture allows pictures to be taken hand-held in low light levels, while maintaining relatively fast shutter speeds to avoid blur from subject motion (a key advantage over image-stabilised, but slow, kit zooms when photographing people without flash indoors). The slightly less tangible aspects of image quality - such as resistance to flare, and the rendition of out-of-focus regions of the frame - are also dealt with nicely.

If the lens has one major flaw, it is a certain propensity to show chromatic aberration, of both the lateral kind (which can be corrected by the in-camera JPEG processing of the D90 and D300), and the longitudinal (which cannot). To be fair the latter is a pretty well unavoidable with a fast prime, but the 35mm F1.8G DX suffers from it to a rather high degree, and in particular can give some unpleasant purple fringing effects if you're not careful.

Overall, though, it seems almost churlish to complain about these flaws in a lens so inexpensive, which gives otherwise such fine results. It's good to see Nikon finally addressing the lack of purpose-designed, inexpensive fast primes for DX format DSLRs, and we hope they - and other companies - continue with this trend. As it is the 35mm F1.8G DX is, for its winning combination of high image quality, large maximum aperture and low price, a lens which deserves to be on many a Nikon shooter's shopping list.

Read more at dpreview.com


Customer Reviews

Most helpful customer reviews

149 of 154 people found the following review helpful.
5Love! Great for moms!
By Hilary
I am a super beginner photographer (wouldn't even call myself that, just a new mama with a camera) with a Nikon D3300. I've had the camera for almost a year and have been disappointed my the photos I was taking (been using the lens kit that came with my camera). I finally decided after doing some reading, that I might benefit from a new lens. I decided on the 35mm instead of the 50mm because I read that the 50 can be hard to use inside of a small house and that the 35 might be a little more versatile, if you can only get one lens. I put the lens on my camera last night, and NOW I AM FINALLY GETTING THE PICTURES I DREAMT OF. The camera makes beautiful bokeh and takes super fast photos, even in low light! I am super impressed with this lens and definitely recommend if you are a mom trying to take up your photos a few notches. As an aside, I stumbled upon the blog "Click It Up A Notch." And read some of their basic tutorials and have learned so much. Hope this helps you make your decision.
Update: I added a picture that I took on my second day of using the lens. Before I got this lens I had essentially stopped using my DSLR because the lens kit was so slow that I was always miss his smile.

77 of 82 people found the following review helpful.
5A must for Portrait photography
By Ripley
Love love love!! Ive been DYING to get this lens forever. This is my second time buying this type of lens and this one takes the cake.
came brand spanking new great condition, box was safe and secure. And the photos it produces are beautiful with amazing depth of field!!

2131 of 2176 people found the following review helpful.
5Great for low light, great focal length for DX, and autofocus will also work with D40, D40x, D60, and D5000 cameras
By Sidarta Tanu
This Nikon 35mm f/1.8G AF-S DX lens produces sharp pictures and great color and contrast. It is also perfect for portrait and other general purposes (semi-macro etc). This lens also produces nice bokeh. The picture quality and bokeh quality are comparable with the other Nikon prime lenses (50mm f/1.8, 50mm f/1.4, 50mm f/1.4 AF-S etc) lens which are famous for being sharp. Overall, this is a very versatile lens. On a non full frame DSLR (such as D40, D40x, D60, D5000, D5100, D3000, D3100, D3200, D7000, D80, D90, D200, D300 etc), this 35mm focal length is equivalent to about 50mm which is considered a normal lens (normal as to being close to a person eye viewing angle perspective).

Many of us, including those who already own the 50mm prime, have been waiting for this lens (prime lens that has wider angle than the 50mm) for a long time, especially for non full frame DSLR owners that usually have about 1.5x magnification due to the smaller sensor size. Those 50mm lens on a non full frame DSLR is equivalent to 75mm which is often too much zoom for many situation. For example in a room where you can't keep backing up to compose your photos, or when taking picture of a group of people where you will need to move back a lot with the 50mm lens. This 35mm lens will solve that problem to some extent as this is a lot wider lens than the 50mm prime lenses. Having said that the 50mm prime lens is still a great lens. If you don't own any of the earlier version of the 50mm lens and wondering if you should get this 35mm or the 50mm, then I would recommend you to get this lens over 50mm, unless you know for sure that you need more zoom than the 35mm for your purpose, then you can go and buy the 50mm or 85mm (both available on f/1.4 or f/1.8).

This lens (DX lens) is not designed for a full frame camera (FX or Film). There will be light fall-off which is quite significant. If you have a full frame DSLR, you might want to get the 50mm f/1.4 AF-S, or the older 35mm f/2 AF-D lens instead.

Being a prime lens (this 35mm lens), you will need to move your feet a lot to compose your picture.

While this lens produces very sharp images at f/1.8, the corner show lower contrast. Sharpness and contrast increases further as you stop down to f/2, f/2.8 and f/4. Sharpness increases slowly after f/2.8 (i.e. at f/2.8 seems to be the optimal, without sacrificing too much speed)

The big plus with this lens over the older 35mm lens is the AF-S feature which is auto focus system that is internal to the lens, very fast and very silent. This lens will please a lot of people who currently own D40, D40x, D60, D3000, D3100, D3200, D5000, and D5100 as they now can benefit from the autofocus.

Another big win is the manual override on autofocus mode (M/A mode), which will allow us to change the focus without having to change the mode to manual mode (this is pretty standard to most Nikon newer lenses but it's quite new for Nikon prime lens series)

This lens doens't have image stabilization (VR), but that is kind of expected as Nikon also doesn't include VR on their new 50mm f/1.4 AF-S lens. It would be nice to have VR (for longer exposure handheld operation, and for people with less stable photography technique) but it will probably increase the size, weight and cost of this lens.

If you are wondering whether you should get a fast lens or a lens with VR (Vibration Reduction), here's my take: In overall, VR does help a lot (as it will reduce camera shake) and will produce better/sharper picture than equivalent lens without VR (especially if the object is static). If the object is moving fast (sports/action) then VR feature alone might not help (depending on how fast the object is moving and how much light is available), and a fast lens often end up being a far better solution, even without VR feature as it will allow much faster shutter speed to freeze motion. Using tripod (and a remote) will substitute for the need of VR feature. In general I would recommend getting a fast lens with VR feature (and usually it is expensive) such as the 70-200 f/2.8 VR, but if one can only get for one or the other, then find out what do you want to use the lens for and then use the guideline mentioned here.

If you are wondering whether you will get the benefit of buying f/1.4 lens over a f/1.8 lens, just remember that the f/1.4 lens is about 60% faster than f/1.8 at its widest aperture setting. With this information, you can decide if the additional speed will justify the additional cost. The bokeh is nicer as well in f/1.4 lens but I think speed is usually the main factor in deciding whether to get the more expensive f/1.4 lens.

Here are the summary of pros and cons for this Nikon 35mm f/1.8G AF-S lens:

Pros:
1. AF-S AF-S AF-S (very fast focus, internal focus, and very silent)
2. M/A mode (manual focus override available on autofocus mode)
3. Very fast lens (f/1.8)
4. Very sharp pictures
5. Great for sport/action photography (though you might need more zoom)
6. Great for indoor and low light situation
7. Great for portrait
8. Bokeh is almost as good as many expensive Nikon tele-lens
9. Perfect for low light with no-flash event. However, also check out the following lens for low light photography: 17-35mm f/2.8, 24-70 f/2.8, 17-55mm f/2.8, 28-70mm f/2.8 or the the 50mm nikon prime lenses.
9. Great focal length (35mm). About 50mm equivalent which is a normal lens (If you need more zoom, you can get the Nikon 50mm or 85mm prime lens or 70-200mm f/2.8 VR lens).
10. Did I already mention very fast and very silent focus? :)

Cons:
1. Being prime lens, you need to move your feet a lot to adjust/compose
2. Being a G lens (no aperture ring available), this lens will not work on manual focus camera where you need to set the aperture from the lens)
3. No VR. As VR will be useful for taking handheld shots on low light (especially if the object is somewhat static or if the photographer doesn't have steady hands when taking photograph)
4. Not designed for full frame cameras (FX or Film) where there will be siginificant light fall-off.

Bottom line: This lens is so versatile that I think everyone should own this lens in addition to all the lenses that they already have (even if they alredy have the 50mm prime lens). Being a very fast lens, it will allow people to take action shot in low light that otherwise wouldn't be able to be do. And now, with AF-S, there is nothing to dislike about this lens (though in my opinion, this lens might attract even more interest if it has a VR feature).

Happy Photographing!

Sidarta Tanu

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